Sharing

Wednesday’s Words: Daily Bread


Moses said to them, “This is the food that the Lord has given you to eat. The Lord has commanded the each of you is to gather as much of it as he needs…. No one is to keep any of it for tomorrow.” But some of them did not listen to Moses and saved part of it. The next morning it was full of worms and smelled rotten… Exodus 16: 15-16; 19-20

 

Because they didn’t trust God to continue providing for them, as insurance, some of the Hebrews tried to save the manna God provided. Their leftovers turned putrid.

 

Isn’t that what happens to us? One day at a time. God sustains us, but we can’t stock up on spiritual blessings. An hour at church on Sunday mornings isn’t enough to get us through the week. Relying on our own abilities instead of relying on God doesn’t work. We need the constant flow of God’s sustaining love to meet the challenges we face every day.

 

The good news is that God’s grace is available at all times in all places. Connecting with God through prayer early in the morning can help carry the awareness of God’s loving presence with us whatever the day holds. We will be given all we need and enough to share with those who cross our path because we’ve tapped into an endless supply. God will always provide what we need when we turn to him. It is safe to trust that. After all, hoarding or being stingy with our blessings is not part of God’s plan.

 

Let’s rely on God to give us the strength we need to sustain us day by day.

 

Prayer: Father, give us today our daily bread.

 

Reflection for sharing: How do you need God’s sustenance today? What can you do to open yourself to receive it?

Wednesday’s Words: Gifts of the Heart

iStock_000003550839XSmall

  As Jesus sat near the Temple treasury, he watched the people as they dropped in their money. Many rich people dropped in a lot of money; then a poor widow came along and dropped in two little copper coins, worth about a penny. He called his disciples together and said to them, “I tell you that this poor widow put more in the offering box than all the others. For the others put in what they had to spare of their riches; but she, poor as she is, put in all she had—she gave all she had to live on.” Mark 12: 41-44

 

While Jesus was eating, a woman came in with an alabaster jar full of a very expensive perfume made of pure nard. She broke the jar and poured the perfume on Jesus’ head. Some of the people there became angry and said to one another, “What was the use of wasting the perfume? It could have been sold for more than three hundred silver coins and the money given to the poor!” And they criticized her harshly.

But Jesus said, “Leave her alone! …She has done a fine and beautiful thing for me…She did what she could…” Mark 14: 3-6

 

One way or the other, money really is no object. At least, that’s how it seems according to these gospel stories. The widow gave what she had. Her gift of a penny was more than enough, and valued by Jesus. The woman who anointed Jesus gave what she had, too. Her expensive gift was not rejected as extravagant, but also valued by Jesus.

 

In God’s economy, it’s not about how much or how little we have to give, but the love and sincerity behind the gift that counts. This applies to more than material gifts. What about the abilities and talents we’ve been gifted with? We don’t need to worry that what we have to share isn’t good enough. We don’t need to worry that we’d be showing off by putting our talents to use. When we are offering ourselves and our abilities to God, we don’t need to worry about other people’s opinions or comments. We don’t even have to worry about the results. Neither the widow’s penny nor the lavish perfume made a huge difference in the worldly scheme of things, but both were precious and appreciated by the Lord.

 

Every time we overcome shyness, or feelings of inadequacy, or fear that people will think we’re trying to show off in order to share what we’ve been given, we are doing “a fine and beautiful thing.”

 

Prayer: Lord, help me recognize my gifts and share them.

 

Reflection: What are your gifts? Who can you share them with today?

Wednesday’s Words: Custom-made Roles

iStock_000003550839XSmall

It will be like a man who goes away from home on a trip and leaves the servants in charge, after giving each one his own work to do and after telling the doorkeeper to keep watch. Mark 13: 34

 

Jesus makes it clear that we’re all supposed to watch, because we don’t know when the master will return, but watching isn’t all we’re supposed to do. Our Master has given “each one his own work to do….”

 

God made us all individuals for a reason. We each have a unique combination of talents, abilities, and interests. We all have a purpose and are uniquely situated to serve as we are.

 

Often, we need to grow where we’re planted. A shy homebody, hiding her beautiful singing voice out of fear disguised as false modesty, may decide to move beyond her comfort zone and take on the role of cantor when the need arises. A businessman might use his management skills to help the parish food bank get off the ground. The work we’re given to do goes beyond our vocation.

 

What would happen if we consider every person that crosses our path today as sent by God? Our work might be to give up a few minutes of our time to listen to them, offer a word of encouragement, or a simple smile. No one is going to encounter the same set of people that you or I do today. We each have a unique opportunity to reach out and touch someone.

 

The work God has in mind for us may or may not be how we earn our living, but it is uniquely ours.

 

Prayer: Lord, who do you want me to serve?

 

Reflection: What are your talents? How can you use them to be of service today?

 

Wednesday’s Words: Work and Love

 iStock_000003550839XSmall

Do all your work in love. 1 Corinthians 16: 14

 

“Do all your work in love.” Simple, but challenging.

 

“God, what does success look like to you in this situation?” I don’t know where I first read this phrase, but I put it on my refrigerator, next to pictures of my grandkids. I see it when I’m tooling around the kitchen and every time I do, it brings me back to what I believe is the reason all of us were put on this planet: love. Jesus told us the most important commandments were to love God, our neighbor, and ourselves. Do we really have something better to do than what God wants us to do? It sure seems like it, most of the time.

 

I went to my first writers’ conference some years ago, eager to pitch my first book proposal. The conference set up author/publisher five minute pitch appointments. It was a bit like speed-dating. Publishers sat stations in the middle of a huge room all afternoon as a never-ending flow of budding authors streamed past them. I was so nervous I could barely concentrate. Then a God-thought occurred to me: I’m not here to get a book contract. I’m here to love. The room was hot. The editor sitting across from me had beads of sweat on her forehead. I wondered if it would be rude or against protocol to offer tissues to a sweating editor. I decided to treat her the way I’d want to be treated. I pulled out a pack of tissues from my purse and offered them to her.  She smiled the first genuine smile I’d seen all afternoon. I felt less nervous. We were just two human beings in a hot auditorium together. Doing my work in love felt good. That editor didn’t offer me a book contract, but I think I was a success that day from God’s point of view.

 

Prayer: Lord, live your love through me today.

 

Reflection: How can you manifest love in whatever you do today?

 

Wednesday’s Words: Rest in God

iStock_000003550839XSmall“Make the people sit down,” Jesus told them. John 6: 10

 

The first thing Jesus did before miraculously feeding the five thousand was to have the people sit down.

 

When we’re spiritually hungry, the first thing we need to do is rest in God. He can’t satisfy our hungry hearts if we’re frantically trying to fill our emptiness on our own. Pre-occupation with busyness and trying to pull ourselves up by our spiritual bootstraps is self-defeating. It leads away from God. I once read a translation of Psalm 46:11, “Be still and know that I am God,” that makes it even clearer: “Stop struggling and know that I am God.” Why is it so hard to stop struggling and rest in God?

 

Yes, we must do our part. God will certainly guide and strengthen us to take the actions we’re meant to take, but we never have to do more than we are able to. When we’ve done our best we can trust God, who “lets us rest in fields of green grass and leads us to quiet pools of fresh water.” (Psalm 23: 2)

 

What if, when we are frustrated in our strained attempts to help others, we entrust them to God’s care, too? We don’t have to be anyone’s savior. Like the disciples who helped feed the five thousand, all we have to do is trust, obey Jesus’ directions, and share what we’ve received.

 

When we’re running on empty, if we allow ourselves sit down and rest, we might be astonished at how we’re nourished and our strength is renewed.

 

Prayer: Lord, may we rest in you.

 

Reflection: What is keeping you from resting in God today?

Wednesday’s Words: Gratitude as Lenten Sacrifice

iStock_000003550839XSmall

Let the giving of thanks be your sacrifice to God… Psalm 50: 14a

 

Gratitude’s not the first thing we think of when we think of sacrifice. Where does gratitude fit in with our traditional Lenten offerings of fasting, almsgiving, and prayer?

 

Fasting: When we give thanks to God we fast from the ego-feeding illusion of independence. We fast from the presumption that we are self-sufficient. The truth is that we cannot, on our own, even guarantee our next breath. Gratitude means sacrificing the comfortable notion of self-reliance. Recognizing ourselves as recipients of God’s gifts puts us in vulnerable position of recognizing our dependence on our Creator.

 

Almsgiving: We can’t give what we don’t have. Whether we donate financially or through acts of service and charity, our giving is sharing what we ourselves have received. Our talents, skills, and finances—including the ability to earn a living—are all gifts from God. If we think of giving to others as passing on what we’ve received, we can’t help but feel gratitude. Offering our personal or financial resources to those who need them is gratitude in action. We sacrifice self-centeredness and self-indulgence when we consider the other people we share this planet with.

 

Prayer: Prayer involves a sacrifice of precious time in our often hectic days. We make room in our crowded agendas to reflect on God’s sacrificial love for us and to offer our thanks. During this Lenten preparation for Easter, we think about the sacrifice Jesus made for us. He willingly accepted the agony in Gethsemane and his suffering and death on the cross for love of us. He offered his life to do for us what we could never do—redeem ourselves from the power of sin. What could be more natural than to express our gratitude in prayer?

 

Prayer: Source of All Good, thank you for all I have and all I am.

 

Reflection: What gifts has God given you? How can you offer him your gratitude today?

 

 

Wednesday’s Word: Rumors

iStock_000003550839XSmall

Have you heard a rumor? Let it die with you. Be brave! It won’t make you explode! Sirach 19: 10

 

What is it about spreading rumors? Even before social media, juicy tidbits got passed around by word of mouth, based on “reliable” sources like, “My cousin’s girlfriend’s hairdresser knew a guy who…”

 

Why do we join in? Maybe it feeds our egos to feel in the know. Maybe it makes us feel one of the crowd. Maybe we’re afraid no one will pay attention to us unless we have exciting news…but where will our credibility be if the rumor ends up being false?

 

Even if it’s a harmless “unconfirmed” news item, why pass it on? Be brave! Keeping that hot gossip to yourself might feel like it will make you explode, but it won’t.

 

We don’t need to prop up our self-esteem with attention-grabbing rumors. We can tune them out by changing the channel. Our worth is guaranteed as children of God. Exploring and following His plan for us will give us plenty to share with others.

 

Prayer: Lord, keep me anchored in your truth.

 

Reflection: What’s the payoff for spreading rumors? What are better ways to get that satisfaction?

Wednesday’s Word: Invitations

iStock_000003550839XSmallI tell you all that none of those who were invited will taste my dinner! Luke 14:24

 

What did a jilted bride do when the groom broke their engagement a week before the wedding? She invited the homeless and guests of a local food bank to attend the feast at the reception hall. Despite her sorrow, she brought joy to those who have little to celebrate. I’ll bet her generosity helped her feel good on some level.

 

How like the parable in Luke’s gospel. Why won’t the invited guests taste the dinner? They didn’t want to go. They had something better to do than go to a banquet. Their excuses sound pretty lame. Who would rather work (try out his oxen) or check out real estate instead of going to a party? Another guest excused himself because he just got married. Who would think so little of his host to assume his new bride wouldn’t be welcome?

 

But their unwillingness to celebrate didn’t stop the party from happening. The host found other guests. He welcomed not only the poor and disabled, but pretty much anybody else he could find that wanted to come. God’s generosity is not thwarted by our refusal to accept it. Why would beggars, invalids, and other last minute invitees accept? Maybe what they had—or didn’t have—made what they were being offered look too good to pass up.

 

The things that kept the first string guests from attending were possessions and a brand new relationship. How do we let our possessions, our work, our romances, get in the way of accepting the goodness God wants to offer us? So often we get what we think we want and still feel let down. Why do we see time with God or time sharing His love in service to others as an obligation? Did you ever do something you felt called to do and feel good about yourself? Did you ever experience the joy of camaraderie in working with others? Did you ever lose yourself and forget your problems by getting caught up in something outside your own plans? We weren’t meant to live in isolation. Sharing creates a nourishing banquet for our hearts.

 

Prayer: Lord, help me say yes to you.

 

Reflection: What have you got better to do today than accept God’s invitation?

 

 

 

 

Wednesday’s Words: The Gift of Surrender

iStock_000003550839XSmall“I am the Lord’s servant,” said Mary; “may it happen to me as you have said.”  Luke 1:36

 

When the angel told Mary she would give birth to Jesus, the Son of God, she had many reasons for saying no: her youth, her unmarried status, her unworthiness, her fear of the consequences. Instead, she accepted, saying, “I am the Lord’s servant.” Instead of serving her fear, or public opinion, or false humility, she was willing to serve God. In surrendering to his plan for her, Mary served not only God, but other people as well. She brought Christ and his saving grace into a world badly in need of saving.

 

Mary could have ignored the angel’s words, or gotten busy with some activity to drown out the call. But she listened. She pondered and questioned how it could be, but she listened and accepted.

 

What are we busy with? Might our activity prevent us from hearing what God’s plan is for us? What might keep us from surrendering to his plan instead of our own? How is God calling us to be his servants? How might he want to use us to share his saving grace with the world…or perhaps with just one other person?

 

Mary didn’t have to know the future, all she had to do was say yes and follow, one step at a time. God provided all that she needed along the way, including a husband to provide for and protect her and the child. Everything unfolded as it was meant to. All Mary had to supply was the willingness to surrender her will to God’s. That’s all we have to do, too.

 

Prayer: Lord, I am your servant. Open my heart to your plan for me.

 

Reflection: What does God have in mind for you today?

Wednesday’s Word: Invitations

iStock_000003550839XSmallI tell you all that none of those who were invited will taste my dinner! Luke 14: 24

 

Why won’t they taste the dinner? Because they didn’t want to. They were invited, but they all had something better to do than go to a banquet. (See Luke14: 16-21) One wanted to work with his new farm animals. One wanted to check out some new real estate. Who would rather work or evaluate investment property than go to a party? Another just got married. Could he possibly have thought his new bride wouldn’t be welcome, too? Who could think so little of his generous host?

 

The A-listers brush off didn’t stop the party from happening. The host in the parable welcomed other guests: not only the poor and disabled, but pretty much anybody else who wanted to what he had to offer. . Why would beggars, invalids, and who-knows-what random mix of last minute invitees accept? Maybe what they had, or didn’t have, made the offer way too good to pass up. After all, the things that kept the original guests from attending were possessions and a brand new relationship.

 

God’s generosity is not thwarted by our refusal to accept it. Who loses out when we say, “No, thanks,” to God? We do. How do we let our possessions, our work, our romances, get in the way of accepting the goodness God wants to offer us? Do we focus so much on work, new toys, or the excitement of new relationships that we have no time or energy for celebrating God’s love feast?

 

Maybe it doesn’t seem like God’s inviting us to a celebration. What if spending time with God or sharing His love in service seems more like an obligation? Did you ever have the experience of doing something you felt called to do and being filled with satisfaction? Or experience the joy of camaraderie in working together for something outside of yourself and your own plans? We weren’t meant to live in isolation. Sharing fellowship makes any experience a banquet of love.

 

I heard on the news recently that when her fiancé broke their engagement one week before the wedding, the jilted bride invited the homeless to attend the non-refundable reception at the banquet hall. Her own sorrow turned to joy, at least on some level. Caught up in her own saga, how easily she could have overlooked the needs of others, and who would blame her? Instead she opened her eyes and heart, accepted God’s invitation to do the loving thing, and shard in His love feast.

 

Prayer: Lord, open my eyes to your invitation.

 

Reflection: What is God inviting you to today? Have you got anything better to do than accept?

Follow Our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

New Release!

Your Faith Has Made You Well: Jesus Heals in the New Testament explores what happened when Jesus healed, what it might have been like for the people involved, and what it means for us today.

Fools, Liars, Cheaters, and Other Bible Heroes” takes a down to earth look at the diverse assortment of biblical characters called by God.

Meditations

But Jesus answered “The scripture says, ‘Human beings cannot live on bread alone, but need every word that God speaks.’” (Matthew 4:4)

 

All Bible quotes are from the Good News Translation unless otherwise noted.

 

It is reassuring that Jesus called fishermen and tax collectors to be his followers. These were laymen, not Scripture experts. It is wise to seek guidance from religious scholars and clergy who have studied Scripture to avoid errors in interpretation. But the Bible is also a gift given to each of us, to use as a basis for prayer and meditation.

 

I’m not a Biblical scholar; I’m an expert only on my own experience. Following the Scripture passage is a brief meditation along with a question or two as a springboard for your own reflections. Please feel free to share your own thoughts or insights on the passage by adding a comment. All comments are moderated, so please allow some time for your comment to be posted.

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Blog Archives

Tags