Monthly Archives: October 2017

Wednesday’s Word: Comfort

 

  “Lord, I have given up my pride and turned away from my arrogance.  I am not concerned with great matters or with subjects too difficult for me.  Instead, I am content and at peace.  As a child lies quietly in its mother’s arms, so my heart is quiet within me.”  Psalm 131:1-2

 

All the peace and comfort of a child nestled in its mother’s arms is available to us.  The price?  Our pride and arrogance.

 

“I can be right or I can be happy,” as the saying goes. Although an honest exchange of ideas can be mutually enlightening, arrogance shifts discussions into heated disputes.  Is verbal victory worth the price?  Why surrender our serenity over a needless contest of egos?

 

Over-reaching ambition, motivated by pride or arrogance, can also drive away our peace of mind.  I once accepted a promotion to a position I detested and was ill suited to perform, because the title sounded impressive.  A cloud of gloom surrounded me for several months until I finally came to my senses. I returned to my previous job – where I worked effectively and happily for many years.

 

When our egos stay right-sized, we fit comfortably in God’s loving embrace.

 

Prayer:  Lord, let me rest secure in Your loving wisdom so that I have no need to cling to my pride.

 

Reflection for sharing:  How is pride blocking your peace of mind today?

 

 

Wednesday’s Word: Freedom

 

 Live as free people; do not, however, use your freedom to cover up any evil, but live as God’s slaves.  1 Peter 2:16

 

How can we live as free people and God’s slaves at the same time? By not using our freedom as an excuse for evil, according to the above quote. It’s easy to see how, in the name of freedom, we can claim the right to do whatever we feel like doing—including those things that might harm ourselves or others.

 

“If it feels good, do it,” as the saying goes. Unfortunately, so many things that initially seem to “feel good” lead to problems, pain, and suffering. Lashing out in anger might release pent up emotion but hurt others and damage relationships irreparably. Excessive self-indulgence—whether with substances like alcohol, unhealthy romantic relationships, or a host of other behaviors—can trap and victimize us and hurt those we care about. Of course these activities are appealing initially—that’s why they’re called temptations. Those temptations can be subtle and patient. Who would be tempted if the pain were evident right off the bat?

 

In serving God’s plan for the greater good we become truly free—free from being bullied by whims, addictive behaviors, or out-of-control emotions. Every time we make the hard right choice instead of following the path of least resistance we’re exercising our free will. One hallmark of maturity is the ability to delay gratification, to sacrifice short-term pay-offs for a greater good. As we grow in our ability to choose and act on what’s good in the long run, we’re increasingly freed from pressures that do not have our best interest in heart.

 

Prayer:  Lord, free me from the tyranny of self-will.

 

Reflection for sharing:  What is the best thing you can do with your freedom today?

 

Wednesday’s Word: Meddling

  If you suffer, it must not be because you are a murderer or a thief or a criminal or a meddler in other people’s affairs. 1 Peter 4: 15

 

St. Peter ranks meddling right up there with criminal activity. The Revised Standard Version translates the line as, “But let none of you suffer as a murderer, a thief, a criminal, or even as a mischief maker.” While it might not be a criminal offense, meddling can cause mischief, havoc, and sometimes real harm.

 

“But I meant well.” “I was only trying to help.” Our motives may be sincere, but they can still cause harm.

 

The difference between meddling and being a Good Samaritan isn’t always clear. Assisting someone who clearly needs or asks for help is not the same as interfering, which is how the Oxford American Dictionary defines meddling. That same dictionary says to interfere is “to take part in dealing with other people’s affairs without right or invitation.”  If our minor child is engaging in risky behavior, we have a right to intervene. If those we’re responsible for are being harmed in some way, we have the right to take protective action. If someone is unconscious and can’t ask for help, we can and should administer first aid or call 911. And of course, if someone asks for help and we can help him or her, of course we should.

 

However, unwanted interference in the affairs of other adults when we are not directly involved can do more harm than good—especially if our goal is to manipulate people into doing what we think they should. It’s tempting to try and straighten out someone else’s problem instead of focusing on our own but it can cause confusion, conflict, and complications. It disrespects the other person’s free will. It sends a message that they are incapable of handling their own lives and that we are superior in some way. It may encourage unhealthy dependency. It can cause us to neglect our own responsibilities. Maybe that’s why Jesus advised us to take the beam out of our own eye before trying to take the splinter out of another’s.

 

Prayer:  Lord, teach me to entrust other adults to Your care.

 

Reflection for sharing: What can help me determine if I’m offering genuine help or meddling? In what situations am I tempted to meddle? What are healthier options?

Wednesday’s Word: Love

How beautiful you are, my love; how your eyes shine with love!  Song of Songs 1:15

 

What’s a romantic love poem doing in the Bible? The passionate exchange between ‘the man’ and ‘the woman’ found in Song of Songs is interpreted as an exchange between God and his people. With this in mind, the poem not only paints beautiful images of love, but also gives us deeper insight into our own relationship with God.  We are cherished.  God calls you and me his ‘love.’ God thinks we are beautiful.

 

Madison Avenue and Hollywood bombard us with superficial images of beauty. Beauty may be only skin deep for those who don’t look any deeper, but wisdom tells us that beauty’s in the eye of the beholder. What does God find beautiful when He beholds us? The quote from Song of Songs gives us a clue:  “How beautiful you are…how your eyes shine with love.” The eyes are the windows of the soul.

 

When God looks at us, he sees past the blemishes and wrinkles on our faces—and on our souls. One thing that makes us beautiful in God’s eyes is the love he sees reflected from within us. Maybe he sees the spontaneous response of love we feel when we realize He loves us exactly as we are.  Maybe he sees love reflected when we reach out to someone else who is also His beloved—whether or not that person seems lovable to us.

 

God loves us—just as we are—always. When we pause long enough to wallow in that awareness, how can we help but shine with love?

 

Prayer:  I love you, Lord.  May I grow in love.

 

Reflection for sharing:  How does it feel to be cherished by God?

 

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Meditations

But Jesus answered “The scripture says, ‘Human beings cannot live on bread alone, but need every word that God speaks.’” (Matthew 4:4)

 

All Bible quotes are from the Good News Translation unless otherwise noted.

 

It is reassuring that Jesus called fishermen and tax collectors to be his followers. These were laymen, not Scripture experts. It is wise to seek guidance from religious scholars and clergy who have studied Scripture to avoid errors in interpretation. But the Bible is also a gift given to each of us, to use as a basis for prayer and meditation.

 

I’m not a Biblical scholar; I’m an expert only on my own experience. Following the Scripture passage is a brief meditation along with a question or two as a springboard for your own reflections. Please feel free to share your own thoughts or insights on the passage by adding a comment. All comments are moderated, so please allow some time for your comment to be posted.

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