Saturday Spotlight: Psalm 16


Protect me, O God; I trust in you for safety.

I say to the Lord, “You are my Lord; all the good things I have come from you.”

Those who rush to other gods bring many troubles on themselves. I will not take part in their sacrifices; I will not worship their gods.

You, Lord, are all I have, and you give me all I need; my future is in your hands.

How wonderful are your gifts to me; how good they are!

I am always aware of the Lords’ presence; he is near, and nothing can shake me. Psalm 16: 1-6; 8


When I’m afraid, this psalm never fails to comfort me. It becomes easier to trust in God for safety when I remind myself of all the good things I have in my life. It helps to recognize that, one way or another, they all come from God. Even when life is painful or chaotic I can find things to be grateful for if I’m willing to look. Although I might feel like I need a microscope to find them, I can see that willingness to look for the good is a gift in itself.


For today, I have no interest in joining those who rush to other gods, mainly because I’ve done it and brought troubles on myself. I’ve relied on my physical comfort, strength, and health. I’ve trusted my intellect, employment, and other people. All of these have let me down at one time or another. I can use and enjoy these blessings, but I can’t afford to make idols of them anymore. My security is shaky if I do. There is only One who has never let me down. If the resources I lean on are taken away, I have to believe God will provide some other way. He always has.


God truly is all I have and He does give me all I need. I found that out when my first marriage ended and an MS attack left me unable to take care of myself. Business as usual was not possible. I didn’t see how I could possibly manage without the supports I was used to. I was way out of my comfort zone and terrified. I didn’t get everything I wanted and it didn’t come on my timetable, but somehow I got everything I needed. Faith moved from my head to my heart. It wasn’t a pretty process, but God got me through to the other side. He truly was all I had during that time, and He truly was all I needed. My future is safe in His hands.


How about you?

  • Who or what are you trusting in today?
  • Can you trust in God for safety?
  • What good things are in your life? Can you see them as coming from God?
  • What “other gods” have you rushed to? What have you gained or lost in the process?
  • How is God giving you all you need?
  • How can you call to mind God’s presence when circumstances are shaky?
  • Why can awareness of God’s presence in the midst of trouble bring you peace?

Wednesday’s Words: The Grace of God

iStock_000003550839XSmallThe apostles spoke to them and encouraged them to keep on living in the grace of God. Acts 13:43b


What does living in the grace of God look like? It probably means we stop trying so hard to earn God’s love. Grace is a gift, not a salary. We don’t have to do a single thing to be worthy of it but we have it nonetheless. Accepting love and forgiveness that we didn’t earn—that we couldn’t earn—doesn’t mean we don’t pay a price. The price is humility. Not a “shucks, I’m not worth it” or groveling self-loathing, but a healthy recognition that God loves us exactly as we are, warts and all


A spiritual director once told me, “God is crazy in love with you.” How humbling. God knows all about me, including the things I’m not too proud of. And he loves me anyway. It’s too good to be true, but it is. Christ was willing to give his life for little old me and for every one of us—even if we don’t care or don’t even notice. Our indifference or arrogance cant stop his love, although they might stop us from experiencing it.


What does living in the grace of God look like? Here’s a few things that come to mind. Please feel free to add to this list.

  • Awareness of God’s grace would keep us humble—a good antidote to judging or looking down on others.
  • It’s a good antidote to looking down on ourselves, too. We’re loved by a perfect God! What more do we need?
  • We don’t have to prop up our self-worth by tearing others down or showing off.
  • We don’t need to pretend we’re better than we are.
  • We don’t need to impress anybody, least of all God. We can afford to be honest because that is how God loves us.
  • We don’t have to be stingy or self-centered. We can afford to reach out to others in love.
  • We don’t have to beat ourselves up over past mistakes and wrongs. God knows all about our past and still loves us. He’s waiting to forgive us when we turn to him.
  • No need to count the sins of others to avoid looking at our own.


Living under the grace of God sounds a lot like heaven on earth, and it’s free for the taking. After all, that’s why they call it grace. We don’t have to hoard it. We can afford to share it with others.


Prayer: Lord, your grace truly is amazing.


Reflection: How can living in the grace of God change your day today?

Saturday Spotlight: Psalm 15

OurMrSun-PsalmsLord, who may enter your Temple? Who may worship on Zion, your sacred hill?

Those who obey God in everything and always do what is right, whose words are true and sincere, and who do not slander others.

They do no wrong to their friends nor spread rumors about their neighbors.

They always do what they promise, no matter how much it may cost.

They make loans without charging interest and cannot be bribed to testify against the innocent.

Whoever does these things will always be secure. Psalm 15: 1-3; 5b


Who can live up to all that? It sounds like we need to be perfect to worship God. But David, who wrote this psalm, didn’t live up to this himself. He had his neighbor Uriah killed so that David’s adulterous affair with Uriah’s wife wouldn’t be discovered. Talk about wronging a friend!


And yet David is referred to in Scripture as a man after God’s own heart. Why? Maybe because he met an important qualification listed in the psalm. David was one of those…whose words are true and sincere… David was honest about his failings. When his wrongdoing was pointed out to him he admitted it and asked for God’s forgiveness.


In the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector, the Pharisee prayed by reciting his merits—maybe he was trying to prove he lived up to Psalm 15. In contrast, the tax collector honestly admitted his sin and asked for God’s mercy. Jesus tells us it was the tax collector who rightly connected with God.


If we’re honest we have to admit we can’t live up to perfect ideals this side of heaven. In fact, trying to appear perfect is a recipe for hypocrisy. It paves the way for slandering others, so our own wrongdoings don’t seem so bad. Integrity is so much better than a veneer of respectability. When we’re honest we’re secure because we have nothing to hide. Our insides match our outsides. We don’t have to live in fear of being found out. Not that we shouldn’t try to live up to our values, but when we fail—as we will—we can, like David, own our mistakes and go to the God of mercy and love, our true source of security.


This psalm is a great format for taking an examination of conscience that can lead the way to receiving God’s forgiveness.

  • What tempts you to put your will above God’s?
  • When have you not lived up to your conscience?
  • In what ways have you been less than honest?
  • Have you gossiped or spread rumors?
  • When have you not kept a promise?
  • In what ways have you sold out?
  • How do these weaknesses contribute to your insecurity or discomfort?
  • Are you willing to bring them to God?
  • Can you trust that God loves you as you are?

I encourage you to read the entire psalm and reflect on whatever words or phrases speak to you today.

Wednesday’s Words: Never too late

iStock_000003550839XSmallThen they picked Jonah up and threw him into the sea, and it calmed down at once. This made the sailors so afraid of the Lord that they offered a sacrifice and promised to serve him. Jonah 1:15-16


Jonah refused to do God told him to. Instead of heading to Nineveh to preach, Jonah hopped a boat in the opposite direction. When a storm almost sank the boat. Jonah realized his responsibility. He asked the sailors to toss him overboard. The pagan sailors showed compassion and tried to row to shore but the storm got worse. Finally, they threw Jonah into the sea. When the storm calmed down instantly, the terrified sailors converted on the spot.


After his ordeal and three days in a whale’s belly, Jonah became willing to do what God intended him to do. He preached to the people of Nineveh and the whole town repented. It is ironic that God used Jonah’s reluctance to convert the sailors he never would have encountered had he not resisted God’s will. Once Jonah surrendered himself for the sake of others, God did what Jonah could not do and calmed the storm. As a result, the sailors on that ship were saved both physically and spiritually.


Like Jonah, we have choices about whether to cooperate with God’s plan for us or not. I don’t think God zaps us with disasters as revenge. I do believe God gives us opportunities to rethink our choices. Jonah did, and from the moment he acknowledged his wrongdoing and thought about others instead of what he wanted, God used him to achieve the purpose


God can bring good out of everything—even our reluctance—when we surrender to His plan. It’s never too late to change.


Prayer: Lord, help me see what you have in mind for me today.


Reflection: How am I avoiding God’s plan for me today? What would it take for me to trust his plan?

Saturday Spotlight: Psalm 14

OurMrSun-Psalms Fools say to themselves, “There is no God!” They are all corrupt, and they have done terrible things; there is no one who does what is right.

The Lord looks down from heaven at us humans to see if there are any who are wise, any who worship him, but they have all gone wrong; they are all equally bad. Not one of them does what is right, not a single one.

Evildoers frustrate the plans of the humble, but the Lord is their protection. Psalm 14: 1-3; 6


Sometimes our “smarts” lead to all kinds of foolishness. An AA member once said, “I never met anyone too dumb to get this program, but I met a lot of people too smart to get it.” C.S. Lewis put it another way, saying “…as long as you’re looking down, you can’t see something that’s above you.” C.S. Lewis  We are more than our brains. There’s no wisdom in making idols out of our intellects and using ourselves as our only reference point.


According to the psalmist, we’re all in the same boat. We say things like, “I’m only human,” or “I’m not perfect,” or “I’m no saint.” So isn’t putting all our trust in our very fallible natures pretty silly? Left to our own devices, not one of us does what is right. If we could save ourselves by being perfect, then, as St. Paul said, “Christ died for nothing.” (Gal. 2: 21) The good news is, God looks down on us with mercy, mercy that is available to us when we are open to it.


Back in my college days, I thought knowledge was power. I was pretty arrogant. Meanwhile, all my good grades and deep thinking friends couldn’t help me grow emotionally or spiritually. I was on shaky ground that kept getting shakier. My first honest prayer as an adult was, “God, I don’t know if you’re out there or not, but if you are, please help me.” It wasn’t an intellectual decision, it was heart-felt desperation. The crisis didn’t disappear, but I was led through events as they unfolded. It was not my own intellect or power that got me through because I was at my wit’s end.


Discomfort can be a good motivator. Our weakness in the face of problems brings us back to healthy humility. Then we become open to the source of strength and wisdom. That may be the genius of God. He can bring good out of anything, even our foolishness. How could we worship someone outside of ourselves until we are humble enough to look beyond our egos? I wonder if any of us become wise without being foolish first?


How about you?

    • When have you felt foolish? How much of that feeling was related to pride?
    • What does being wise mean to you?
    • How can humility help you grow?

Wednesday’s Word: Victory

iStock_000003550839XSmallAnd on that cross Christ freed himself from the power of the spiritual rulers and authorities; he made a public spectacle of them by leading them as captives in his victory procession. Colossians 2: 15


A victory parade? Crucifixion looked more like defeat. God’s idea of success is very different from ours. What was Jesus’ victory? He accomplished His Father’s will in spite of all the opposition the world could muster.


What looked like weakness actually brought us forgiveness and new life because our debts were nailed with Christ on the cross. Jesus did for us what we could never do for ourselves–free us from the bondage of our wrong-doing and the burden of guilt and same that goes with it.


“God, what does success look like to you in this situation?” I don’t know the source of this quote—if you do, please let me know. I love it because it reminds me to get over myself. Sometimes, success means refusing to continue a pointless argument. Sometimes it means being satisfied that one person got something out of something I wrote instead of worrying about the number of books I sold. Success can also mean letting go of my agenda and listening to someone who needs to talk.


These things don’t always feel like victory, and they may not look like it to most people. That’s okay. Every time I imagine what success looks like to God, I let go of my will and feel more peaceful in accepting things as they are. When that happens (and I wish it happened more often than it does) I can see my pride, self-will, impatience, being led away in Christ’s victory procession.


Prayer: Lord, what does success look like to you in this situation?


Reflection: How might your idea of success change today if you look at things from God’s point of view?

Saturday Spotlight: Psalm 13

OurMrSun-PsalmsHow much longer will you forget me, Lord? Forever?

How much longer will you hide yourself from me?

How long must I endure trouble?

How long will sorrow fill my heart day and night?

How long will my enemies triumph over me?


Look at me, O Lord my God, and answer me. Restore my strength. Don’t let me die.


I rely on your constant love; I will be glad, because you will rescue me.

I will sing to you, O Lord, because you have been good to me.         Psalm 13: 1-3; 5-6



Sometimes it feels like the pain will never end. I’ve felt that way more than once: when loved ones were seriously ill; when my first marriage was ending; when a car accident left me bed-ridden for months. The pain was real and seemed endless, but I’ve been brought through ever nightmare I’ve ever experienced. Apparently God did restore my strength.



Although it might sound discouraging at first, this is a psalm of hope. The psalmist complained, but did not despair. Even in the midst of intense, long-standing pain, the he didn’t give up talking to God. He didn’t decide there is no God. The psalmist trusted God enough be honest. He trusted God’s love more than his own feelings. He affirmed that trust and made a commitment to sing to God…why? Because God had been good to him.



We don’t have to be pushed around by our feelings. It’s an amazing exercise to count our blessings when it seems like there’s nothing to be grateful for. Focusing on the good we’ve enjoyed in the past and searching for good in the midst of our problems (without denying those problems) bolsters faith. When our feelings, circumstances, or tunnel vision try to convince us there’s no reason for hope, pro-actively calling God’s goodness to mind does our hearts good. Putting evidence of God’s activity in our lives down in black and white has make a world of difference to me when things looked bleak.


How about you?

  • When have you felt abandoned by God? What happened?
  • When you feel bad, does it seem like good times will never come again? When you feel good, does it feel like bad times will never come again?
  • Feelings come and go. How can that help you keep perspective in rocky times?
  • When have you gotten through a challenge? Did you realize it as answered prayer at the time?
  • How has God been good to you? Can you sing to him about it, or at least say thank-you?

Wednesday’s Words: Inner Conflict

iStock_000003550839XSmallIsrael, you have in your possession some things I ordered you to destroy! You cannot stand against your enemies until you get rid of these things! Joshua 7: 13b


What do we have to get rid of in order to stand against our enemies…especially the enemies within ourselves? It can be threatening to think we are responsible—at least partially—for the problems in our lives. The good news is if we are part of the problem we have a chance to do something about it.


So, what are we hanging on to that keeps us from conquering the self-defeating behaviors that hurt us and those we love? When we’re willing to take an honest look at how we contribute to our pain it becomes possible to change that part of the equation. Do we rely on substances like alcohol or nicotine?  Or compulsive behaviors like recreational shopping? They seem to relieve tension but can cause more problems and tension in the long run. Is another person causing us misery? Are we clinging to an unhealthy relationship out of a misplaced sense of loyalty or fear of being alone?


Once we look at how we contribute to the problem, we can see which behaviors might have to go. That doesn’t mean we’ll be willing to let them go. Even unhealthy patterns can feel comfortable. After all, we must get something out of them or we wouldn’t hang on to them. But when we take an honest look, can we see that the benefits are no longer worth the price we pay in self-respect, damaged relationships, or physical and emotional health?


Maybe one of the things we have to get rid of is the false pride that tells us we should be able to kick these enemies all by ourselves. If we can’t see our part, or we see it and don’t know how to let go, we can seek help. I have to believe that if we ask, God will provide us with the guidance and willingness we need to get rid of anything that is harmful to us or our loved ones.


It’s scary to let go of even a false sense of relief if we have nothing to replace it with. That’s where asking for assistance can help us see alternatives we may never have thought of on our own. With God’s grace we can find the guidance and support we need and the courage to let go of self-defeating behaviors. We can face our enemies unafraid with an arsenal of healthy coping skills and an army of support.


Prayer: Lord, help me let go of self-destructive tendencies.


Reflection: What do you need to let go of to stand against the enemy you’re facing today?

Saturday Spotlight: Psalm 12

OurMrSun-PsalmsHelp us, Lord! There is not a good person left; honest people can no longer be found.

All of them lie to one another; they deceive each other with flattery.


“But now I will come,” says the Lord, “because the needy are oppressed and the persecuted groan in pain. I will give them the security they long for.”


The promises of the Lord can be trusted; they are as genuine as silver refined seven times in the furnace.


The wicked are everywhere, and everyone praises what is evil.

Keep us always safe, O Lord, and preserve us from such people.                                Psalm 12: 1-2; 5-8



Wickedness everywhere. Evil praised as good. Insincerity. Sounds a lot like today, doesn’t it? From red carpet treatment and celebrity air kisses to political correctness beyond the bounds of reason, flattery and euphemisms for selfish behavior abound. But this is nothing new. If we believe the psalmist, human nature hasn’t changed all that much in the last few thousand years.


But there is hope. God promised to come and help those who are in pain. And he did. Hebrew slaves were freed and led to the Promised Land. Ancient Rome persecuted Christians and yet their faith survived and spread. People continue to abuse their power and make selfish choices that hurt others. There is much evil and pain in the world. God is still at work to give people the security they long for. Not necessarily freedom from struggle, but the reassurance that they are not alone. God’s promises can be trusted. Where there is love, God is working through people reaching out to help those who suffer or simply to let them know they are not alone.



I can also identify with the psalmist’s words on a more personal level. I’ve done my share of flattering others–especially when I was younger, to get someone to like me or to avoid conflict. If I haven’t actually praised evil, there have been times when I’ve kept my mouth shut rather than take a stand. On the other hand, I’ve also been in pain and felt oppressed by health challenges, abusive relationships, and more. The security I longed for didn’t always come because the problem disappeared. Sometimes it came in the form of friends who let me know I wasn’t alone, even though they couldn’t take away my pain. Sometimes it came as a dose of strength that kept me going for one more day—or hour. This has increased my trust in God. This helps me believe that no matter what I’m going through, I will come out the other side, and at the very least my experience can help someone else.


How about you?

  • Human nature apparently hasn’t changed that much over the centuries. Is that discouraging, comforting, or both?
  • When have you felt oppressed or in pain? How did you come through it? Has any good come out of the experience?
  • What evidence do you have that the God’s promises can be trusted?


I encourage you to read the entire psalm and reflect on whatever passage speaks to you today.

Wednesday’s Word: Inspiration

iStock_000003550839XSmall…let us be completely holy by living in awe of God. 2 Corinthians 7: 1b


Inspiration is contagious. When I was in grade school, girls mostly jumped rope or played tag at recess. There was also a clapping game we played together sung to the tune of “Take Me Out To The Ball Game.” One girl, who wore a leg brace and could only use one of her arms, always stood alone and watched the rest of us play. I never gave her much thought until the day I saw my best friend approach the girl. They figured out a way to play the clapping game using just one hand. I was in awe of my friend. Her compassion and ingenuity would have been impressive in someone even more than ten years old. I wanted to be like her. I began playing with the physically challenged girl, too, and we became friends.


Awe is a great motivator. We don’t grow spiritually by brow-beating ourselves. Holiness isn’t fitting ourselves into a moral straight jacket. When we admire others who make generous use of their time, talents, and treasure, they inspire us to do likewise.


Who could be more awe-inspiring than God? Which is why spending time with Him invites us to grow spiritually. When we reflect on God’s love, mercy, truth, and the like, we immerse ourselves in God’s goodness. Mean or shabby motives in our own nature pale in comparison and we become willing to let them slip away.


Time spent with our awesome God changes us from the inside out.


Prayer: Holy, holy, holy Lord.


Reflection: Which of God’s awe-inspiring attributes speaks most to your heart today?



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But Jesus answered “The scripture says, ‘Human beings cannot live on bread alone, but need every word that God speaks.’” (Matthew 4:4)


All Bible quotes are from the Good News Translation unless otherwise noted.


It is reassuring that Jesus called fishermen and tax collectors to be his followers. These were laymen, not Scripture experts. It is wise to seek guidance from religious scholars and clergy who have studied Scripture to avoid errors in interpretation. But the Bible is also a gift given to each of us, to use as a basis for prayer and meditation.


I’m not a Biblical scholar; I’m an expert only on my own experience. Following the Scripture passage is a brief meditation along with a question or two as a springboard for your own reflections. Please feel free to share your own thoughts or insights on the passage by adding a comment. All comments are moderated, so please allow some time for your comment to be posted.

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